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20130101
20130131
STATION
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN 3
MSNBC 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Jan 25, 2013 2:00pm PST
them from -- >> you have a lazy black president and stupid women and the cliches that these are like out of something in the 1920s. where do they get this stuff from? >> this is all part of planet republican. i mean, they're not viewing the demographics right. they're not viewing the policies right, and their tone, they're tone deaf again and again. >> what are they up to? are they playing to the base maliciously? >> i think they're watching fox tv too much. >> who do they think they are winning with? >> rand paul won this race in kentucky by playing to the tea party base. that's how he got -- >> in a nonpresidential year. the trouble is two years from now we're looking to a nonpresidential year and it could just be what they're up to here is just riling up their base because they know that's who shows up at the pollsened and the middle of the road vote mother has had other things to think about isn't paying attention. >> it's going back to clinton bashing -- >> one last question. joy, didn't you think that the poison in the anti-hillary thing from the right that went on for all thos
CBS
Jan 30, 2013 6:00pm EST
cliff. i got so tired. i'm calling it the budgetary butte, with your permission. it became so cliche into that final quarter of the year and you saw the market largely shrugged it off. >> brown: a butte is more picturesque than the cliff, but go ahead. yes. >> yes, indeed. so i feel that investors at least are not bothered about this. they see this as a game of chicken going up and down pennsylvania between the white house and congress. and much of this has been kicked down the road effectively for a couple of months. we do know that we have an unsustainable budget deficit situation but on the flip side you have economists like paul krugman out there saying do not worry about the budget deficit, this is not the time to be slashing public spending. as you saw that actually helped push that economy into decline in the final quarter. that was a big variable in that. so this is a huge debate. but on balance what you're seeing is a lot of the unexpected has surprised the positive. you mentioned housing, housing is not just virtuous in that it helps homeowners and construction workers out
PBS
Jan 30, 2013 5:30pm PST
cliche into that final quarter of the year and you saw the market largely shrugged it of. >> brown: a butte is more picturesque than the cliff, but go ahead. yes. >> yes, indeed. so i feel that investors at least are not bothered about this. they see this as a game of chicken going up and down pennsylvania between the white house and congress. and much of this has been kicked down the road effectively for a couple of months. we do know that we have an unsustainable budget deficit situation but on the flip side you have economists like paul krugman out there saying do not worry about the budget deficit, this is not the time to be slashing public spending. as you saw, that actually helped push that economy into decline in the final quarter. that was a big variable in that. so this is a huge debate. but on balance what you're seeing is a lot of the unexpected has surprised the positive. you mentioned housing, housing is not just virtuous in that it helps homeowners and construction workers out there and material suppliers, it's also helping the banking sector which, after all, gorged
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
--i mean, the human element, in a fresh way without dredging up a lot of cliches. c-span: where do you live now, by the way? >> guest: right now, i'm a visiting writer in residence at memphis, university of memphis. c-span: memphis university? >> guest: yes. c-span: when did you first know that you liked writing? >> guest: well, as i say, in high school, i was writing science fiction. i was--excuse me... c-span: so in school itself? >> guest: yeah. well, it was something i just did. i never thought of it as a profession or even a trade. i just sort of did it and... c-span: did you ever have a point where a teacher came up and said, 'randall, this is good'? >> guest: actually, my teachers were fairly critical of my writing up to a point. i--really, it was in college when i started taking it a little more seriously and--i mean, i--again, i'd been writing very, you know, pitiful stories and i fell under the tutorship of one max steele, who was a--the--ran the writing program at chapel hill for a long time, and he challenged a lot of my ideas about taste and source material, and he sort of knew
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2013 8:00pm EST
? there was no guarantee we were going to defeat hitler or that britain was going to survive. it has become a cliche, but it has not been said here tonight, so i will be the one to say. my favorite quote from winston churchill, the americans can always be. -- depended on to do the right thing, after they had exhausted every other possibility. the demographics are irreversible and will ultimately drive the right and the left to the reality that we have to make some kind of changes. >> you are our realist. how do you think this ends? >> of course, the honest answer is i don't know. what i worry about, and i really appreciate the reminder of history, because i think is really important, and we forget history too often. what i worry about is the trust deficit. if you look at every institution, business, congress, sports figures, the church -- it doesn't matter what it is. no one trusts the institutions that operate in our country. and congress is not doing so well. >> why does that matter? it matters because, for a society to be vibrant and grow and take risks and innovate, we not only need to like each
CNN
Jan 30, 2013 11:00am PST
're across the street from here is -- it is almost cliche, but it is amazing. there is one building that is completely destroyed. another building that is damaged, but not destroyed at all. and just on the other side of that, completely destroyed another building. this tornado came through here and just was very selective, but completely devastating in the targets it found. >> it is almost like it sounds like that zigzag we hear so often when we talk about tornadoes. miguel, thank you so much. george, let me bring you in. i hope you have a monitor. have you seen pictures of this, this tornado we have been showing out of adairsville, georgia? >> well, i've seen a few clips from the adairsville tornado and it looks like something that i would be used to seeing in kansas, in may. so it is very ahtypical for thi time of year. but we occasionally get deep south tornado outbreaks in late january, february. they tend to be fast moving storms and therefore quite dangerous. but they do happen. and people that live in that part of the country really do need to watch it pretty much year round.
CNN
Jan 31, 2013 4:00am PST
alabama, wind, rain and more misery. what you're looking at there is a building that's almost cliche to say but that building was perfectly fine. the one next to where we're standing was a rental, apparently nobody was in there so nobody injured or killed here, but it is always amazing to see these things, how it skips from one and misses another. >> miguel marquez for us this morning. it is always amazing how a swath is just shredded and then homes stand right nearby. thanks, miguel. appreciate the update. let's get right to our meteorologist, indra petersons. let's look at the forecast, is it moving out? >> for the most part it's just left in the northeast. the story today really isn't about that severe line of storms but rather all that cold air behind it that was the troublemaker in the first place. i want to give you an idea how strange this weather was in the first place. monday, 48 degrees. look at chicago, 48 degrees. by tuesday it got up to 63. yesterday severe weather, 44 degrees. currently now down to 17 with a chance of snow showers in the forecast. so, yes, very wacky we
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 1:00am EST
. speaker, some might say that saying those things is a cliche. but as we all know, members are going to have to engage with and rigorous debate, and there it is going to be the clash of ideas, a rigorous debate, but it needs to be done with good faith and the spirit of compromise. i realize and some argue that compromise is a sign of weakness. in fact, one of the great strengths, mr. speaker, of our nation's founders, was their ability to compromise. the very structure of this institution, the united states congress, the very structure of our institution, which joined the people's house, where we are all privileged to serve, with the united states senate, was known as what? the connecticut compromise, or the great compromise. that is the very basis of our founders. too often we forget that while we should never, we should never compromise our principles, we must always, mr. speaker, we must always be prepared to compromise in the service of our principles. a couple weeks ago, "the economist" described another example of compromise -- this one that justice brandeis described as "one o
MSNBC
Jan 23, 2013 3:00am PST
cliche, but i was seeing a lot of it. and in our game, you know, and you've been around me long enough to know, i want our guys to care about each other fiercely. that's why the '04 team worked so well. we didn't have a ton of rules. but when the game started, they knew what they were doing and they cared about each other. and i saw stuff that i didn't think gave saw stuff that i did think gave us their best chance to win and i wanted to tell them that. and i walked back to my office, and said, they didn't grasp it, they didn't listen. they were just wondering why i had a meeting. >> this book calls mike barnicle a boston multi-media personality. that's questionable. >> we had to give him some liberty. >> so there are great baseball fans all over the country, but boston is special. red sox nation is different. what are the fans like? what is the pressure like for a manager in boston that's not like any place else? >> if you like baseball, it's an unbelievable place to work. there's passion, there's interest. along with that comes a headache every once in a while. because there's no lit
FOX News
Jan 1, 2013 3:00am PST
of the most overused played out, annoying cliche phrases in the history of words. a list has been reloosed by lake superior state university of phrases from 2012 that should be banned from the english language. fiscal cliff, good luck on that. spoiler alert. bucket list, trending. and yolo, the acrow number meaning -- i never heard that. >> steve: my kids say that all the time. >> brian: what does it mean? >> steve: you only live once. yolo. >> brian: really? ban ago phrase i never heard. >> steve: 12 minutes after the top of the hour on this tuesday. coming up, the fiscal cliff, i know we're -- we're supposed to stop using the word. not only the only word on americans' minds, today more. today we'll meet a guy who says he may have to lay off workers because of the obama taxes. >> brian: will lawmakers say more money in their paychecks? i heard this deal kills that raise 9d ad [ male announcer ] coughequence™ #8. waking the baby. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robi
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 12:00pm EST
's make an clich if you don't mind. >> kneal franklin, director of law enforcement in prohibition. we hear a lot about leadership. steve said something about leadership and since you talked about this as we have no leadership there is this an opportunity for the president, and what is the president's latitude? i know the executive branch enforcement but what is the president's latitude, and what can he do, what can the white house do and what should he do? i'm hoping these answers get to him. >> let's go to the gentleman. we also have a couple tweets. >> i'm with the governing magazine. i want to go back to the broad federalism issue which i talked to several people that said as much as jonathan, that between gay marriage, the affordable care act and marijuana were kind of redefining federalism in a lot of ways or we could be. so i wanted to ask you and i know this is intentional, but what are the potential ramifications for the system of government depending on how the various the dates are put out? >> i love how we saved a little questions for the end. >> ashley from l.a. is asking how m
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)